Category: Black Panther

Photos: 25th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards

Photos: 25th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards

Photos of Michael attending last nights Screen Actors Guild Awards have been added to the gallery.

Press/Video: ‘Black Panther’ Wins Best Cast in a Motion Picture at the 25th Annual SAG Awards

Press/Video: ‘Black Panther’ Wins Best Cast in a Motion Picture at the 25th Annual SAG Awards

A HUGE congratulations to Michael B. Jordan and the rest of the cast for their SAG Award for Best Cast in a Motion Picture!! I can’t even express how happy this makes me. Check out the announcement and acceptance speech below.

Press: Santa Barbara Film Fest: ‘Black Panther’ Standout Michael B. Jordan Tapped for Cinema Vanguard Award

Press: Santa Barbara Film Fest: ‘Black Panther’ Standout Michael B. Jordan Tapped for Cinema Vanguard Award

Congratulations Michael!

The 31-year-old will pick up his hardware at the fest on Feb. 7.

Michael B. Jordan, who won raves in 2018 for his work as a supporting actor in Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther and the lead actor in Steven Caple Jr.’s Creed 2 (and a Critics’ Choice nom for the former on Monday), will receive the Cinema Vanguard Award at the 2019 Santa Barbara International Film Festival, the fest announced this week.

The 31-year-old, whose prior credits include Coogler’s Fruitvale Station (2013) and Creed (2015) as well as the game-changing TV series The Wire (2002) and Friday Night Lights (2009-11), will be honored Feb. 7 at Santa Barbara’s historic Arlington Theatre as part of the festival’s 34th edition, which will run Jan. 30-Feb. 9.

SBIFF’s Cinema Vanguard Award recognizes actors who have forged their own path, taking artistic risks and making a significant and unique contribution to film. Previous recipients include Willem Dafoe, Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams, Rooney Mara, Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones, Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio, Amy Adams, Jean Dujardin, Bernice Bejo, Nicole Kidman, Peter Sarsgaard, Christoph Waltz, Vera Farmiga, Kristin Scott Thomas, Stanley Tucci and Ryan Gosling.

Said SBIFF executive director Roger Durling in a statement: “It’s thrilling to honor Michael B. Jordan this year for the emboldened way he’s shown us what it means to be a movie star for the 21st century, mixing sensitivity with swagger, choosing important material that remains full of integrity yet becomes world phenomenon, and forging a cinematic partnership with visionary director Ryan Coogler.”

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

Press: The Favourite, Black Panther Lead Critics’ Choice Awards Nominations

Press: The Favourite, Black Panther Lead Critics’ Choice Awards Nominations

Waking up to this news made me very happy. A huge congratulations to Michael B. Jordan and the rest of the Black Panther cast and crew for their amazing work on the film. Now lets bring it home for the win!

The period drama picked up 14 nods, while Black Panther followed up with 12.

The Favourite has run away with the Critics’ Choice Awards nominations. The darkly funny period drama, starring Olivia Colman as Queen Anne and Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone as warring cousins vying for royal attention, will lead the ceremony with a whopping 14 nominations, including nods for best picture, best actress (Colman), best supporting actress (Stone and Weisz), and best director (Yorgos Lanthimos).

The Favourite was followed closely by Marvel juggernaut Black Panther, which picked up 12 nods, including best picture, best acting ensemble, and best supporting actor (Michael B. Jordan). Damien Chazelle’s First Man, which seemed to lose some steam earlier in the awards race, came in third with 10 nods. Meanwhile, Mary Poppins Returns, A Star Is Born, and Vice followed with 9 nods apiece. While A Star Is Born has long been considered a front-runner this season, neither Vice nor Mary Poppins has yet hit theaters. Both, however, have slowly been gaining traction with critics and beyond, making a strong showing when Golden Globes nominations were announced; Vice ended up leading that field, with six nods total. And while the Globes are, well, the Globes, the Critics’ Choice nods offer a slightly more predictive glimpse at which films might might go all the way to the Oscars.

Speaking of films that might go all the way: Roma, which was named best picture on Sunday by both the Los Angeles Film Critics Association and the New York Film Critics Online, landed eight Critics’ Choice nominations. Alfonso Cuarón’s critically adored period drama, inspired by his Mexican upbringing in the 1970s, was painted as a best-picture front-runner early on in this awards race, and critics have been eager to prove the predictions right. Green Book, another early contender, landed seven nominations.

In the TV realm, HBO and Netflix tied with 20 nods apiece, thanks to the success of shows like Sharp Objects and One Day at a Time, respectively. Amy Adams stood out with two nods; one for her supporting turn in Vice, and one for her lead turn in Sharp Objects.

FX followed closely behind HBO and Netflix, with shows like The Americans and The Assassination of Gianni Versace picking up five crucial nods each. Meanwhile, Showtime’s Escape at Dannemora made a strong debut with five nods of its own. The full list of nominations can be read here. The Critics’ Choice Awards will air January 13, 2019 on the CW.

Source: Vanity Fair

Press/Video: Michael B Jordan talks BLACK PANTHER | The Movie Report

BLACK PANTHER star Michael B. Jordan discusses the film after a special screening at the Linwood Dunn Theater at the Academy’s Pickford Center for Motion Pictures in Hollywood on Thursday, December 6, 2018.

Press: Michael B. Jordan Plays With Puppies While Answering Fan Questions

Michael B. Jordan (“Creed II”, “Black Panther”, “Friday Night Lights”) stops by to answer your questions about his career, workouts, and favorite anime – all with the help of some very furry friends. To learn more about these pups and others that are up for adoption, head to PacificPupsRescue.com

Press/Podcast: Michael B. Jordan Plus Best NBA Rookies and Wizards Chaos | The Bill Simmons Podcast

HBO and The Ringer’s Bill Simmons calls up his buddy Joe House to talk struggling NBA teams, NBA rookies, the Tiger Woods-Phil Mickelson pay-per-view event, and NFL picks. Then Bill sits down with actor Michael B. Jordan to talk ‘Black Panther,’ his new film ‘Creed II,’ upcoming projects, and more.

Press: Why Michael B. Jordan Is More Than a Movie Star

Press: Why Michael B. Jordan Is More Than a Movie Star

This piece contains mild spoilers for “Creed II.”

In the third act of “Creed II,” the heavyweight champ Adonis Creed squares off in a rematch against Viktor Drago, the Ukraine-based boxer and son of the man who killed Adonis’s father in the ring three decades earlier. Bloodied and weary after several rounds — but ever the tenacious fighter — Adonis gathers the will to keep going with the encouragement of his coach and mentor, Rocky Balboa.

“I’m dangerous!” Adonis sputters through his swollen mouth, echoing the pronouncement he had given Rocky in an earlier scene, under vastly different circumstances.

It is the movie’s “Clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose,” the inspirational battle cry of the protagonist as he faces the challenge of his life. As said by the actor Michael B. Jordan, who delivers the line not with a guttural oomph but the eager-to-please fervor of a young kid hoping to impress his father, it doesn’t quite carry the intimidation the line seems to demand. Nevertheless, it is both endearing and invigorating — you just know Adonis is ready to conquer Viktor this time around.

It’s this moment that may help explain why, in the same year Jordan has received some of the most glowing reviews of his career for playing Killmonger in “Black Panther,” a debate has percolated on Reddit, Twitter and in everyday conversations among pop culture enthusiasts: Is Michael B. Jordan a good actor?

Where some see a fascinating interpretation of a supervillain, others see bad acting. Critics of Jordan say that he lacks the swagger and menace of the Killmonger character and that he appears to be reading off cue cards. (One of the movie’s most-discussed lines, “Just bury me in the ocean, with my ancestors that jumped from the ships — they knew death was better than bondage,” is usually held up as the prime example.) To some extent, I can understand these sentiments; like Adonis declaring himself “dangerous,” the idea of what Killmonger represents — a problematic, burn-it-all-down philosophy in the name of black empowerment — sometimes overpowers Jordan’s interpretation onscreen.

Still, the arguments made against his acting abilities more generally are perplexing: He doesn’t disappear into his roles (as Jamie Foxx did in “Ray”); he always plays the same character. Such critiques miss the point: Jordan has made it clear he desires to be a capital “M” Movie Star, along the lines of Will Smith (who himself has always been transparent about his box-office aspirations), not a character actor. “I want people to see me win,” he told The New York Times in a conversation alongside Denzel Washington earlier this year, adding, “I want to be the leading man.”

And there always have been actors who are considered great who aren’t chameleons like Christian Bale or Meryl Streep — you never forget you’re watching Denzel Washington, Leonardo DiCaprio or Cary Grant, but you are drawn in nonetheless.

Jordan’s strengths as an actor lie not in his ability to shock or scare or surprise — but in his willingness to be vulnerable and charismatic. These qualities have been evident as far back as his early breakthrough role as Wallace, a bright, baby-faced drug dealer in “The Wire.” Over the course of Season 1, Wallace looks after some of the younger abandoned children in the housing projects and experiences pangs of extreme guilt when his actions inadvertently lead to a murder. Jordan lent the character openness and sensitivity: He embodies the good-hearted kid who isn’t cut out for the ruthlessness of the drug trade, making his death at the hands of his childhood friends — and his pleas to them in those final moments — that much more heartbreaking.

In “Fruitvale Station” more than a decade later, his first major star turn and first collaboration with the director Ryan Coogler, Jordan portrayed Oscar Grant III, a young man who was killed by a police officer in Oakland, Calif., without painting him as a saint.

In one scene, we see Oscar interact with three people over the course of just a couple of minutes, and his demeanor shifts seamlessly between each exchange. He pleads with the manager of the grocery store where he once worked to rehire him, but quickly turns angry and combative when rebuffed, revealing Oscar’s desperation under dire financial straits. Left alone in the aisle, the camera lingers briefly on Oscar, contemplating the severity of his situation, before the voice of a woman he assisted earlier breaks through to thank him for his help; here he effortlessly turns on the charm. Finally, he greets his friend working the deli counter with a warm, genial familiarity, and lies about having convinced the manager to give him his job back.

As he finally exits the store and turns away from his friend, his smile fades, and a sense of helplessness washes over his face. These are subtle exchanges, but engrossing nonetheless — a brilliant, succinct depiction of everyday code switching, and it works mainly because Jordan carries it off so well.

“Creed II” takes the idiosyncrasies Jordan has honed in his onscreen persona throughout the course of his career and fully reveals the kind of actor he is capable of becoming. If not as surprisingly profound as its immediate predecessor, “Creed,” the latest “Rocky” installment portrays Adonis as an underdog despite being a heavyweight champ, a celebrated fighter who still has much to prove. He’s handsome and lovable, but not necessarily smooth, as seen in a lighthearted moment where Adonis nervously asks Bianca to marry him. He feels unsatisfied by his success.

In “Creed II,” Jordan shows how he can translate an array of emotions with just a look. When Adonis and Bianca await the results of a test for their newborn daughter, Jordan displays anxiety, fear and an overwhelming sense of sadness at the recognition of what may be ahead for his family.

Giving such a performance in a crowd-pleasing sequel positions Jordan in the realm of other actors he has name-checked as having the careers he wishes to emulate: Washington, Smith, Tom Cruise and Leonardo DiCaprio. You can see a bit of each of those actors in Jordan’s career moves so far — the transition from troubled youth roles into hunky A-lister (DiCaprio in “The Basketball Diaries,” and later “Titanic” and “The Departed”); the prestigious boxing part requiring tremendous physical transformation (Washington in “The Hurricane” and Smith in “Ali”); ventures into the realm of sci-fi/fantasy (Cruise in “War of the Worlds,” “Minority Report”).

It’s rare these days for actors to open movies on the strength of their names and charming personas alone, but in developing a respected partnership with Coogler — like Washington and Spike Lee, and DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese — and starting his own production company to create the roles he wants, Jordan has molded himself into a performer who takes on prestigious projects that also play up his good looks.

Whether this leads down the path of Oscar nods — still Hollywood’s ultimate marker of having made it, however superficially — remains to be seen. But when he taps into his sensitivity, turns on the charm and lays his feelings bare in any given moment, he’s electrifying.

Source: NY Times

Press: Michael B. Jordan and Tessa Thompson admit they’ve played with their Marvel action figures

Press: Michael B. Jordan and Tessa Thompson admit they’ve played with their Marvel action figures

Michael B. Jordan and Tessa Thompson have effortless chemistry as Adonis and Bianca in the Creed franchise, and recently displayed that chemistry for EW’s cover shoot celebrating the release of Creed II.

But the pair have more in common than Creed. They also both play characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe — Jordan starred as Killmonger in Black Panther, and Thomspon took on the role of Valkyrie for Thor: Ragnarok. And one of the many perks of being part of the MCU is that you get your own action figures. When asked if they’ve played with their own figurines, they both responded affirmatively.

“I have mine in my kitchen above the sink so I see her when I wash dishes,” Thompson said, and hers isn’t the only one she’s collected. “Other women friends of mine, if they have one, I have a girl gang. There’s Lupita [Nyong’o, as Nakia from Black Panther]. There’s Evan Rachel Wood from Westworld.” One action figure was notably absent from Thompson’s collection, though. “I don’t have Killmonger, I’m so sorry,” Thompson confessed to Jordan. Jordan said he doesn’t have Valkyrie either. “I’ll give it to you,” Thompson told him. “I have an extra one.”

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Press: Michael B. Jordan, now a Hollywood heavyweight, punches up

Press: Michael B. Jordan, now a Hollywood heavyweight, punches up

“Creed II,” which opened in theaters Wednesday, finds Michael B. Jordan’s character, Adonis Creed — like the actor, himself — adjusting to his newfound prominence: reaching the pinnacle of his profession while still having to fight for what he believes in. Associated Press/Warner Bros. Pictures

NEW YORK — If Michael B. Jordan’s path to this moment was condensed and edited, it might look, appropriately, like a training montage.

Images of Jordan cutting his teeth on the Baltimore streets of “The Wire” and the Texas football fields of “Friday Night Lights,” followed by hints of a soaring talent (“Red Tails,” “Chronicle”), shattering breakthroughs (“Fruitvale Station”) and setbacks (“Fantastic Four”) before reaching, with a pair of haymakers (“Creed,” “Black Panther”), heavyweight status.

Parallel to Jordan’s steady rise has been the 31-year-old’s expanding sway behind the scenes in Hollywood. His production company, Outlier Society Productions, was among the first to embrace the inclusion rider, adopting the pledge to seek diverse casts and crews just days after Frances McDormand referenced it at the Oscars. Jordan was also influential on a similar agreement by WarnerMedia, making Warner Bros. the sole major studio thus far to sign up.

“He’s always been a big-idea guy,” says Ryan Coogler, who directed Jordan in “Fruitvale Station,” “Creed” and “Black Panther.” “He’s always been conscious of his own responsibility.”

“Creed II,” which opened in theaters Wednesday, finds Jordan’s character, Adonis Creed — like the actor, himself — adjusting to his newfound prominence: reaching the pinnacle of his profession while still having to fight for what he believes in. As Steven Caple Jr.’s boxing drama prepared to open in theaters, Jordan went door-to-door in Georgia urging people to vote in the midterm elections.

“You’ve been doing one thing for 20 years. Constantly working at it, trying to grow and become successful, or whatever your version of success is. And then you have a moment in time where everything seems to be coming together at the same time. Everything seems to be happening. But you live in a society, in a world that’s kind of going to (expletive),” Jordan said in a recent interview. “So to be able to use one to help the other, is something. To try to find your voice.”

It’s an answer with shades of Jordan’s typical performance: earnest, thoughtful, tinged with pain. Then he exhales.

“I don’t know, man,” says Jordan. “Honestly, there’s a lot going on right now and I’m trying to find my place in all of it, professionally and personally.”

A big part of Jordan’s quest was “Black Panther,” in which he played Erik Killmonger. The part is ostensibly a villain, but in Jordan’s hands, Killmonger — a wounded, fatherless warrior bent on reparations through violence — has a depth uncommon if not outright alien to comic-book films. Between Killmonger and the Wakanda leader T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) is a larger dialogue, one fraught with history, between African identity and the African diaspora.

“Making a movie, you rarely come out the other side the same. You either grow or regress. I came out a different man,” says Coogler. “The conversation that was had between T’Challa and Killmonger, what it means to be African — I didn’t know I needed that movie as much as I did until after I made it. I look back and I say: ‘Man, I really needed that. I needed that conversation.'”

The performance has made Jordan one of this year’s leading supporting actor contenders for the Academy Awards. Coogler praises his friend’s vulnerability in a complicated role.

“He was one of the few African-American characters and he was carrying the weight of that cultural representation,” says Coogler. “Mike brings a lot of the empathy with him, as a person and as a performer. That’s one of the things that makes him special. Almost as soon as you see him, you empathize with him.”

“Black Panther,” the year’s biggest domestic blockbuster and most resonant cultural event, left a mark on Jordan.

“Playing Killmonger, carrying that oppression, that feeling of being a representation of the African diaspora, I felt a certain pressure and responsibility to get it right. That was a very maturing process for me,” Jordan says. “To be very unapologetic, I had to play that role.”

A sequel to the acclaimed 2015 spinoff (it grossed $173.6 million worldwide on a $35 million budget), “Creed II” was fast-tracked by MGM in part to capitalize on the success of “Black Panther” and Jordan’s growing profile. Caple, whose feature debut was the 2016 indie film “The Land,” had his first meeting with producers around Thanksgiving last year. By the first week of January, he was in Philadelphia getting ready to shoot.

Caple preserved and expanded upon Coogler’s naturalistic approach, and the film’s best scenes unlock raw intimacies outside the ring. Especially notable is the chemistry between Jordan and Tessa Thompson, who plays Adonis’ girlfriend (“Mike feeds off of Tessa a lot,” says Caple), and the surprising pathos of the father-son relationship between Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren) and Viktor Drago (Florian Munteanu). In an echo of “Rocky IV,” the younger Drago is Adonis’ foe this time.

Caple credits Jordan for the film’s emotional authenticity.

“He’s genuine. Then you meet him in person and you realize he’s the same way in real life. You can’t act that or fake that. He used that as a vehicle to get where he is today,” says Caple. “Right now, he’s expanding on that with his business, with his production company, with his brand, and still being for the people in many ways.”

Jordan recently finished shooting “Just Mercy,” in which he stars as civil rights defense attorney Bryan Stevenson. The Warner Bros. production was the first Jordan made with the inclusion policy in place.

“The set, the crew was very diverse, all very capable. It was a great experience. Hopefully other studios and other productions will follow our lead and demand the same thing from their sets,” says Jordan. “Change takes time. It’s a small step, but it’s the first step. I’m not expecting Rome to be built in a day.”

Source: Chicago Daily Herald

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